Recipes and stories for everyday life

Apple Dutch Baby

Apple Dutch Baby

The Dutch Baby recipe, or German pancake among other names, has always intrigued me, but usually by the time weekend brunch arrives everyone is already craving their favorites, so recipe testing something new is met with skepticism. Not this time though! When I mentioned making the Apple Dutch Baby, my family embraced my idea with enthusiasm. Even better, this warm, delicious Apple Dutch Baby disappeared faster than I could have anticipated!

Everyone at our house universally loved this recipe, including my youngest who is a toddler. I think it will make an encore appearance again this weekend at brunch!

Why make an Apple Dutch Baby? Because you get to enjoy the flavor of pancakes with the added bonus of soft delicious apples—reminiscent of apple pie filling—covered in maple syrup and without having to stand over the stove making pancakes one by one. It’s a win for everyone. A delicious win.

Looking for additional brunch ideas? Try my open-faced egg sandwiches, easy baked apples with streusel, or maple honey granola!

Dutch Baby Pancake

The Dutch Baby is a large pancake that is baked in the oven. It’s versatile, and can be served for any meal depending on how you customize it. The Dutch Baby is also known as a German pancake or a Dutch puff. The way it puffs up in the oven seems almost magical, and it is easier to make and serve than individual pancakes. Getting this mouthwatering meal on the table is quick and easy!

Apples

A mix of Gala and Honeycrisp apples works nicely for this recipe. However, any apple that is sturdy enough for baking will work well. Use varieties you enjoy to customize the flavor to suit your tastes. I sliced these pretty thin, about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch, and the core and stem were removed; however, I did not peel the apples. In fact, I think the peel adds a bit of color to the recipe. That said, if you prefer to peel them like you would for an apple pie, then I would recommend adding that as a step in your preparation of the ingredients.

Skillet

An oven-safe skillet is needed for this recipe to bake the Dutch Baby pancake. I recommend a 12-inch cast-iron skillet for this recipe, which is what I used to make our Apple Dutch Baby. If you do not have a cast-iron skillet, just be sure you are using an oven-safe skillet that is properly rated for the temperature used to bake the pancake. If your skillet is smaller than 12 inches, you will want to scale the flour and milk accordingly.

Serving

When serving this pancake, gently slide it out of the cast-iron skillet onto a serving platter to be cut into wedges, or use a silicone spatula to cut the wedges while the pancake is still inside the cast-iron skillet. It is important to avoid damaging the skillet with sharp knives. Taking these precautions will preserve the integrity of your cookware.

Notes

I had to increase the quantities of some of the ingredients to adapt it for my 12-inch skillet. The original recipe was meant for a 9-inch or a 10-inch skillet. Additionally, I increased the cinnamon, vanilla, and apples (among other ingredients) used for additional flavor. In essence, I increased the amount of the batter proportionately for a 12-inch skillet, but then I increased some of the ingredients overall beyond that ratio to enhance the flavor. The result was a warm, comforting Dutch Baby pancake that was reminiscent of apple pie. A perfect combination!

Apple Dutch Baby in cast-iron skillet.
Apple Dutch baby in cast-iron skillet.
Apple Dutch Baby in cast-iron skillet.

Apple Dutch Baby

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Total time: 30 minutes
Makes 4 generous servings

Equipment

  • Cutting board
  • Knife
  • Mixing bowl
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Spatula
  • Cast-iron skillet*

*I used a 12-inch cast-iron skillet for this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter (divided; 2 tablespoons and 2 tablespoons)
  • 3 apples, sliced and cored
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 F. In a mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Stir the dry ingredients to evenly distribute. Add eggs, milk, and vanilla. Stir all of the ingredients until the batter is smooth.
  2. In the skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of butter over low heat. Pour the batter into the skillet and bake for 15 minutes or until the Dutch Baby is light brown and has risen and puffed.
  3. In a medium saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons of butter over low heat. Add apples and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add brown sugar and maple syrup and continue stirring. Cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes. Apples should be tender.
  4. Top the baked Dutch Baby with the apple mixture and syrup from the saucepan. Lightly dust with powdered sugar (optional). Best served warm, enjoy!

Adapted from and inspired by the Better Homes & Gardens Apple Dutch Baby and Williams Sonoma Bob’s Dutch Baby.


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4 thoughts on “Apple Dutch Baby”

  • This is a bad recipe! There is way too much apple syrup and it ruins the wonderfull crispness and pillow-iness of a Dutch baby and turns it into a soggy mess. It is like a little kid allowed to swamp their pancakes in syrup.
    A better way would be to put 1 diced apple into the batter to cook with the Dutch baby, and then to top with syrup as needed. The Dutch baby then would retain its crispy outside and fluffy inside.

    • Hi John, I’m sorry you did not enjoy the recipe. We love maple syrup, but perhaps using less is more suited to your tastes. My family and friends have personally made and tasted this recipe and found it enjoyable. Thank you for visiting and reading Hope, Love, and Food.

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